Australia Day

Australia Day, 26 January is always a controversial date. Here is a post I wrote for SCIS a few years ago

Australia Day

Australia Day, January 26, is considered to be a commemoration of nationhood by many Australians. For other Australians, however, it marks a deep loss – of sovereignty, family and culture. Here are some titles from the SCIS catalogue which look at the clash between European settlers and the Aboriginal peoples:

1788 to 1809 : from First Fleet to Rum Rebellion by Victoria MacLeay ; [edited by Lynn Brodie].(SCIS No. 1552979).  The first 22 years of the colonisation of Australia began with the arrival of the First Fleet and ended with the aftermath of the only military insurrection Australia has ever experienced. This book covers the major events: the arrival at Botany Bay, the settlement at Sydney Cove, the battle to survive, heroic explorations, and tensions between the new arrivals and indigenous peoples. ISBN 9780864271136

A commonwealth of thieves: the improbable birth of Australia by Thomas Keneally. (SCIS No. 1627531)
The history of the first four years of the convict settlement of Australia. Using personal journals and documents, Keneally re-creates the overseas voyage and the challenges Governor Arthur Phillips faced upon arrival: unruly convicts, disgruntled officers, bewildered and hostile natives, food shortages and disease. He also offers portrayals of Aborigines and convict settler. ISBN 9781400079568

That deadman dance by Kim Scott.(SCIS No. 1595239)
Told through the eyes of black and white, this is a story about a fledgling Western Australian community in the early 1800s, known as the “friendly frontier”. It shows that the first contact did not have to lead to war. ISBN 9781408829288

Rethinking settler colonialism : history and memory in Australia, Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and South Africa  edited by Annie E. Coombes (SCIS No. 1638689)
Focuses on the long history of contact between indigenous peoples and the white colonial communities who settled in Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. Looks at how histories of colonial settlement have been mythologised, narrated, and embodied in these countries in the twentieth century. ISBN 9780719071690

A failure to understand: early colonialism and the indigenous peoples by Margaret McPhee. (SCIS No. 1659262).  A look at the monumental clash between European colonalism and the Aboriginal peoples; from the first tentative and difficult interactions of the early explorers to the arrival of the First Fleet. ISBN 9781742455136

The Australian frontier wars 1788-1838 by John Connor  (SCIS No 1112716).  From the Swan River to the Hawkesbury, and from the sticky Arnhem Land mangrove to the soft green hills of Tasmania, this book describes the major conflicts fought on the Australian frontier to 1838.  ISBN 0868407569

The other side of the frontier: Aboriginal resistance to the European invasion of Australia by Henry Reynolds (SCIS No. 1311253). The publication of this book in 1981 profoundly changed the way in which we understand the history of relations between indigenous Australians and European settlers. ISBN 0868408921

Forgotten war by Henry Reynolds (SCIS No. 1623535).  Australia is dotted with memorials to soldiers who fought in wars overseas, but there are no official commemorations of the battles fought on Australian soil between Aborigines and white colonists. ISBN 9781742233925

The Black War : fear, sex and resistance in Tasmania by Nicholas Clements (SCIS No. 1659002)
Between 1825 and 1831 close to 200 Britons and 1000 Aborigines died violently in Tasmania’s Black War. It was by far the most intense frontier conflict in Australia’s history, yet many Australians know little about it. ISBN 9780702250064

All images and summaries provided by SCIS Syndetics

The Australian frontier wars
The Australian frontier wars
That deadman dance
That deadman dance
Commonwealth of thieves
Commonwealth of thieves
The other side of the frontier
The other side of the frontier

 

Some 21st century school library stuff

At  end of the 2017 school year, the school made the decision to fund a new Library Management System. I had recommended three cloud based systems and based on my SCIS experience arranged for a demonstration  from Infiniti on the basis of, ifthis was not the system for us we would spend further time evaluating the other two systems.

Happily all went well and we acted fast in securing an end of term changeover which involved moving the database to the new system. Supported by an excellent team we have been operating the circulation system since the third day back at school. We have one more webinar session and then we switch on the full system. In the meantime we are handling our borrower changeover and working to clean up the data to enable a cleaner version of the catalogue and of search results.

We will now be able to offer the school a cloud based landing page with federated search facilities which students can access via Compass our LearningMangement System thus providing 24/7 access to the collection. Our task is to make our online space as attractive as our physical space.

We are very conscious of the opportunity this gives us right now to work with faculties and introduce the new access to the library and emphasise our Libguides to students and of course staff.

Display

Professional development and Social Media

2007 and it all changed for us in Education. We had technology and with Facebook Social Media went mainstream and we had to adapt.

For professional development I was an early adopter of Twitter settling on the moniker Larry the Librarian. I could connect with librarians and educators, I was exposed to ideas and could share thoughts.

Somehow my Twitter feed has become a mish-mash and I now question its value as professional development. As a school librarian I regard this as very important for building up my VIT hours. I intend to remake my professional twitter account as an learning tool. I will expand on this further and outline my intent and results in a post..

Facebook is troublesome for privacy, data and security issues and its sheer might it concerns me. It can be a very useful professional tool but I wish to sort it out for personal reasons to make it a more useful social tool for me. A post will follow.

This leads me to LinkedIn and my professional presence. My third task this break is to tidy up my websites and look at how I am presenting myself. This will hopefully lead to a focused professional and social media focus. Resharpening the brand as they say.

 

Genrefication

After a discussion onf the OZTL  listserve I thought that is was worth gathering together some of the sites I had researched

Reading for pleasure: A research overview Christina Clark and Kate Rumbold National Literacy Trust November 2006

Taking the guesswork out of genre Brendan Eicholzer

Taking the guesswork out of genre – SlideShare

Arranging library fiction by genre

IN DEFENSE OF LIBRARY GENREFICATION

 

Good Keen Librarian

An enthusiastic primary school librarian and ICT coordinator talks about libraries, using technology and implementing new ideas.

Thursday, 24 April 2014

Genre Shelving – the (almost) finished product

Genre Shelving – the pros and cons so far

Genrefication — one primary school librarian’s experience

IN DEFENSE OF LIBRARY GENREFICATION

 

Library Genre-fication Project

 

 

The Case Against: Library genrefication is …

 

Library Genre-fication Project

Advocacy

Here is a post on advocacy that I have copied and pasted across from OZTL posted

 

It’s vital to support arguments promoting school libraries and TLs with sound evidence. Demonstrate the outcomes of TL activity, school library programs etc – beyond listing input, ie. what you do.

 

Evidence can include: statistics, qualitative evaluations and anecdotal feedback. Even NAPLAN can be your friend! Real examples and quotes are particularly powerful.

 

Supplement the evidence you gather within your own school with research findings from wider afield, Australia and internationally. Look to: reports from Softlink; articles by researchers like Lyn Hay, Ross Todd, Barbara Combes; advocacy resources from organisations like ASLA, SLAQ, ALIA, The Hub<http://hubinfo.wordpress.com/tls/advocacy/>, AASL<http://www.ala.org/aasl/advocacy/resources>

 

 

 

This article summarises international research that provides compelling evidence about the impacts of TLs and school libraries on literacy and learning outcomes: Hughes, Hilary, Bozorgian, Hossein, & Allan, Cherie (2014) School libraries, teacher-librarians and student outcomes : presenting and using the evidence.<http://eprints.qut.edu.au/74876/> School Libraries Worldwide, 20(1), pp. 29-50.

 

 

 

This report provides evidence from Gold Coast schools: Hughes, Hilary E. (2013) School libraries, teacher-librarians and their contribution to student literacy development in Gold Coast schools.<http://eprints.qut.edu.au/60260/> SLAQ, Brisbane.

 

 

 

Ann Gillespie’s research demonstrates how TLs can be effective evidence based practitioners: Gillespie, Ann M. (2013) Untangling the evidence : teacher librarians and evidence based practice.<http://eprints.qut.edu.au/61742/> PhD thesis, Queensland University of Technology.

— and look out for her forthcoming article in Access

 

 

 

To help illustrate your points, here’s a great infographic from Library Research Service in Colorado http://www.lrs.org/2013/02/27/make-the-case-for-school-libraries-with-our-new-impact-studies-infographic/

 

 

Best of luck  Hilary

 

 

 

Dr Hilary Hughes

 

Senior Lecturer, School of Cultural and Professional Learning

 

Faculty of Education, QUT

 

 

Dewey Digger

DeweyDigger.com
DeweyDigger.com

DeweyDigger.com Explore knowledge.

Welcome, wonderful web wanderer. Explore knowledge via the Dewey Decimal Classification; just clickety-click.

What a teacher librarian can do for you

What a teacher librarian can do for you

Michael.jpg

Study Skills (Ergo, Diigo)

Research skills
Learn how to improve your skills to get the best information and results.
Study skills
Learn how to stop procrastinating, reduce stress, and get ready for exams

Essay writing skills

Learn how to analyse your question, then plan and write a great essay.

Web 2.0 tools

Economics resources

Current Economics Short videos from the Khan Academy

Discussions of economic topics and how they relate to current events.

  1. Economics of a Cupcake Factory
  2. Cupcake Economics 2
  3. Cupcake Economics 3
  4. Inflation, Deflation & Capacity Utilization
  5. Inflation, Deflation & Capacity Utilization 2
  6. Inflation & Deflation 3: Obama Stimulus Plan
  7. Unemployment
  8. CPI Index
  9. Simple Analysis of Cost per Job Saved from Stimulus
  10. Unemployment Rate Primer
  11. Floating Exchange Resolving Trade Imbalance
  12. China Pegs to Dollar to Keep Trade Imbalance
  13. China buys US Bonds
  14. Review of China US currency situation
  15. Data on Chinese M1 Increase in 2010
  16. Data on Chinese Foreign Assets Increase in 2010
  17. Data on Chinese US Balance of Payments
  18. Chinese inflation
  19. Floating Exchange Effect on China
  20. Floating Exchange Effect on US

Business and Franchise websites

NAB business site http://www.nab.com.au/Business_Solutions

A word cloud of economic terms

Its a jungle out there

Its a jungle out there

 

Comparing Reading on a device and a book

This list of articles was collated by

Dr Barbara CombesLecturer,  School of Information Studies Charles Sturt University Building 05, Boorooma Street Wagga Wagga NSW 2678 Australia in reply to a query on OZTL

Cuddling_with_multiple_devices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ackerman, R. & Goldsmith, M. (2011) Metacognitive regulation of text learning: On screen versus on paper. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 17(1), 18-32

 

Bailey, J. (2010). You wouldn’t read about it. The Age. Retrieved Sep. 16, 2010 from May 9, 2010 http://www.theage.com.au/national/you-wouldnt-read-about-it-

20100508-ul30.html

 

Birkerts, Sven. (2004). The truth about reading: It’s easy to blame technology for our younger generation’s declining interest in literature. But what, if anything, can be done about it? School Library Journal, 50(3).

 

Carr, N. (2010). How the internet makes us stupid. The Age. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from  http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology-news/how-the-internet- makes-us-stupid-20100909-15383.html

 

Coiro, J. & Dobler, B. Coiro, J., & Dobler, E. (2007). Exploring the online reading comprehension strategies used by sixth-grade skilled readers to search for and locate information on the Internet. Reading Research Quarterly. 42, 214-257. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from  http://www.newliteracies.uconn.edu/pubs.html

 

Coiro, J., Knobel, M., Lankshear, C., & Leu, D.J. (Eds). (2008). Handbook of research on new literacies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from  http://www.newliteracies.uconn.edu/pubs.html

 

Dixon, E. (2010). The importance of books and reading in early learning. Literacy News. Retrieved May 23, 2010 from http://www.childup.com/blog/The-Importance-of-Books-and-Reading-in-Early-Learning/

 

Federman, M. (2010). Why Johnny and Janey can’t read, and why Mr. and Ms. Smith can’t teach: The challenge of multiple media literacies in a tumultuous time. Retrieved Sep 1, 2010 from http://individual.utoronto.ca/markfederman/WhyJohnnyandJaneyCantRead.pdf

 

Jabr, F. (2013). The reading brain in the digital age: The science of paper versus screens. Scientific American. Retrieved June 3, 2013 from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=reading-paper-screens

 

Liu, Z. (2005). Reading behavior in the digital environment: Changes in reading behavior over the past 10 years. Journal of Documentation, 61(6), 700-712

 

Mangen, A.; Walgermo, B.R.; Bronnick, K. (2013). Reading linear texts on paper versus computer screen: Effects on reading comprehension. International Journal of Educational Research, 58, 61-68.

 

Paul, A.M. (2011). ‘Digital literacy’ will never replace the traditional kind. Time Magazine. Retrieved March 19, 2014 from http://ideas.time.com/2011/10/26/why- digital-literacy-will-never-replace-the-traditional-kind/

 

Szalavitz, M. (2012). Do e-books make it harder to remember what you just read? Time. Retrieved March 8, 2014 from http://healthland.time.com/2012/03/14/do-e-books-impair-memory/

 

Wolf, M. (2009). Beyond decoding words. Does the brain like e-books? New York Times. Retrieved May 5, 2010 from http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/14/does-the-brain-like-e-book

A post from BB on copyright

This was posted by Barbara Braxton on OZTL_net 14 August and contains useful information about copying digital materials

 

1. There is a list of what is protected at http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/copyright-guidelines/copyright—a-general-overview/1-3-what-is-protected-(types-of-works)

2. Under Educational Licence B, the Hard Copy Scheme allows the copying and communication of a reasonable portion of hard copy text works (eg books and printed journals). In this instance, communication is defined as “Communicate means making copyright material available online or electronically transmitting copyright material. ‘Making available’ can include putting material on the internet or intranet. ‘Electronic transmission’ includes emailing, streaming or electronic reticulation.” But the kicker is “reasonable portion” which is defined as “in the case of a literary, dramatic or musical work in hard copy, 10% of the pages of the work or if the work is divided into chapters, up to one chapter”.
3. Scanning or photocopying a larger part of a text work by a student or teacher to assist his or her research or preparation of an educational course can still be a fair dealing for the purposes of research and study. However, the teacher/student must assess whether copying more than a reasonable portion would be fair. For example, it is probably fair to copy the whole of a book for research or study if the book is out of print so the school/TAFE can’t buy it.

4. While there may be flexible dealing exceptions, this will not often apply and the following have to be assessed…
◦the proposed use is narrow in scope
◦whether it would conflict with a normal way the copyright owner exploits the material and ◦whether the use would unreasonably harm the copyright owner http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/copyright-guidelines/what-can-i-copy-communicate-/2-1-text-works

5. Changing a print work to a digitised one may be considered format shifting and the rules regarding that are at http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/information-sheets/schools/format-shifting I have written to the NCU for clarification. I will share the response.

6. This is what I found about audio books on Smartcopying http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/information-sheets/schools/using-itunes-in-schools/using-itunes-in-schools/using-itunes-in-schools

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Copying audio books on the iPods for loan in the school library

Trish is the librarian at Heathcoat High School. She would like to start making audio books available for loan to students on iPods. Trish has found 4 audio books from iTunes that she would like to purchase and loan to students on the library’s 20 iPods.

Can Trish copy the audio books straight from her iTunes account onto each iPod or must she purchase a copy of each audio book for each iPod?
Trish must purchase an audio book for each individual iPod. This is because s 200AB will only apply to where the copy is made for educational instruction and removed from the iPod as soon as practicable after it has been used for educational instruction. In this case, the audio books will be made available to students on a permanent basis throughout the year. Trish will need to purchase 20 copies of each audio book to download on to each iPod. The individual iPods can then be loaned out to different students in the school as required.
http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/information-sheets/schools/using-itunes-in-schools/using-itunes-in-schools/using-itunes-in-schools
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Barbara