Here is a post on advocacy that I have copied and pasted across from OZTL posted


It’s vital to support arguments promoting school libraries and TLs with sound evidence. Demonstrate the outcomes of TL activity, school library programs etc – beyond listing input, ie. what you do.


Evidence can include: statistics, qualitative evaluations and anecdotal feedback. Even NAPLAN can be your friend! Real examples and quotes are particularly powerful.


Supplement the evidence you gather within your own school with research findings from wider afield, Australia and internationally. Look to: reports from Softlink; articles by researchers like Lyn Hay, Ross Todd, Barbara Combes; advocacy resources from organisations like ASLA, SLAQ, ALIA, The Hub<>, AASL<>




This article summarises international research that provides compelling evidence about the impacts of TLs and school libraries on literacy and learning outcomes: Hughes, Hilary, Bozorgian, Hossein, & Allan, Cherie (2014) School libraries, teacher-librarians and student outcomes : presenting and using the evidence.<> School Libraries Worldwide, 20(1), pp. 29-50.




This report provides evidence from Gold Coast schools: Hughes, Hilary E. (2013) School libraries, teacher-librarians and their contribution to student literacy development in Gold Coast schools.<> SLAQ, Brisbane.




Ann Gillespie’s research demonstrates how TLs can be effective evidence based practitioners: Gillespie, Ann M. (2013) Untangling the evidence : teacher librarians and evidence based practice.<> PhD thesis, Queensland University of Technology.

— and look out for her forthcoming article in Access




To help illustrate your points, here’s a great infographic from Library Research Service in Colorado



Best of luck  Hilary




Dr Hilary Hughes


Senior Lecturer, School of Cultural and Professional Learning


Faculty of Education, QUT



Dewey Digger Explore knowledge.

Welcome, wonderful web wanderer. Explore knowledge via the Dewey Decimal Classification; just clickety-click.

Welcome to the English Language Growth Resource:

Welcome to the English Language Growth Resource: 

Project summary

Support for this project has been provided by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council, an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.

  • Module 1: Staying motivated about your English. Module 1 introduces students to the importance of one’s motivation and beliefs and how these factors can have an impact on one’s learning.
  • Module 2: Using your English. Module 2 introduces students to opportunities where they might use their English more and how to cope in these situations. This module also alerts users to consider how much they are actually using English in their day-to-day lives and how this might be increased.
  • Module 3: Studying in English. This module covers strategies of value for academic learning, such as, social strategies (learning with groups, friends, etc), cognitive strategies (actual ways to expand knowledge) and metacognitive strategies (ways to organise one’s learning).
  • Module 4: What your lecturers expect of you. In Module 4 advice is provided about the expectations of lecturers. This information focuses in particular on the value of time commitment and exposure to the discipline area through extended reading.
  • Module 5: Strategies for you to try. Module 5 is the longest module and includes strategies for improving the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing). This module also includes a section on developing one’s vocabulary for better discipline understanding and information literacy.

Find the modules here

Writing, Grammar & Vocabulary
Listening and Speaking
Plagiarism and Referencing
Activities and Quizzes
Learning and Study skills

Edith Cowan University

University of Melbourne

Macquarie University

Deakin University

What a teacher librarian can do for you

What a teacher librarian can do for you


Study Skills (Ergo, Diigo)

Research skills
Learn how to improve your skills to get the best information and results.
Study skills
Learn how to stop procrastinating, reduce stress, and get ready for exams

Essay writing skills

Learn how to analyse your question, then plan and write a great essay.

Web 2.0 tools

Economics resources

Current Economics Short videos from the Khan Academy

Discussions of economic topics and how they relate to current events.

  1. Economics of a Cupcake Factory
  2. Cupcake Economics 2
  3. Cupcake Economics 3
  4. Inflation, Deflation & Capacity Utilization
  5. Inflation, Deflation & Capacity Utilization 2
  6. Inflation & Deflation 3: Obama Stimulus Plan
  7. Unemployment
  8. CPI Index
  9. Simple Analysis of Cost per Job Saved from Stimulus
  10. Unemployment Rate Primer
  11. Floating Exchange Resolving Trade Imbalance
  12. China Pegs to Dollar to Keep Trade Imbalance
  13. China buys US Bonds
  14. Review of China US currency situation
  15. Data on Chinese M1 Increase in 2010
  16. Data on Chinese Foreign Assets Increase in 2010
  17. Data on Chinese US Balance of Payments
  18. Chinese inflation
  19. Floating Exchange Effect on China
  20. Floating Exchange Effect on US

Business and Franchise websites

NAB business site

A word cloud of economic terms

Its a jungle out there

Its a jungle out there


Comparing Reading on a device and a book

This list of articles was collated by

Dr Barbara CombesLecturer,  School of Information Studies Charles Sturt University Building 05, Boorooma Street Wagga Wagga NSW 2678 Australia in reply to a query on OZTL









Ackerman, R. & Goldsmith, M. (2011) Metacognitive regulation of text learning: On screen versus on paper. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 17(1), 18-32


Bailey, J. (2010). You wouldn’t read about it. The Age. Retrieved Sep. 16, 2010 from May 9, 2010



Birkerts, Sven. (2004). The truth about reading: It’s easy to blame technology for our younger generation’s declining interest in literature. But what, if anything, can be done about it? School Library Journal, 50(3).


Carr, N. (2010). How the internet makes us stupid. The Age. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from makes-us-stupid-20100909-15383.html


Coiro, J. & Dobler, B. Coiro, J., & Dobler, E. (2007). Exploring the online reading comprehension strategies used by sixth-grade skilled readers to search for and locate information on the Internet. Reading Research Quarterly. 42, 214-257. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from


Coiro, J., Knobel, M., Lankshear, C., & Leu, D.J. (Eds). (2008). Handbook of research on new literacies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Retrieved Sep. 1, 2010 from


Dixon, E. (2010). The importance of books and reading in early learning. Literacy News. Retrieved May 23, 2010 from


Federman, M. (2010). Why Johnny and Janey can’t read, and why Mr. and Ms. Smith can’t teach: The challenge of multiple media literacies in a tumultuous time. Retrieved Sep 1, 2010 from


Jabr, F. (2013). The reading brain in the digital age: The science of paper versus screens. Scientific American. Retrieved June 3, 2013 from


Liu, Z. (2005). Reading behavior in the digital environment: Changes in reading behavior over the past 10 years. Journal of Documentation, 61(6), 700-712


Mangen, A.; Walgermo, B.R.; Bronnick, K. (2013). Reading linear texts on paper versus computer screen: Effects on reading comprehension. International Journal of Educational Research, 58, 61-68.


Paul, A.M. (2011). ‘Digital literacy’ will never replace the traditional kind. Time Magazine. Retrieved March 19, 2014 from digital-literacy-will-never-replace-the-traditional-kind/


Szalavitz, M. (2012). Do e-books make it harder to remember what you just read? Time. Retrieved March 8, 2014 from


Wolf, M. (2009). Beyond decoding words. Does the brain like e-books? New York Times. Retrieved May 5, 2010 from

A post from BB on copyright

This was posted by Barbara Braxton on OZTL_net 14 August and contains useful information about copying digital materials


1. There is a list of what is protected at—a-general-overview/1-3-what-is-protected-(types-of-works)

2. Under Educational Licence B, the Hard Copy Scheme allows the copying and communication of a reasonable portion of hard copy text works (eg books and printed journals). In this instance, communication is defined as “Communicate means making copyright material available online or electronically transmitting copyright material. ‘Making available’ can include putting material on the internet or intranet. ‘Electronic transmission’ includes emailing, streaming or electronic reticulation.” But the kicker is “reasonable portion” which is defined as “in the case of a literary, dramatic or musical work in hard copy, 10% of the pages of the work or if the work is divided into chapters, up to one chapter”.
3. Scanning or photocopying a larger part of a text work by a student or teacher to assist his or her research or preparation of an educational course can still be a fair dealing for the purposes of research and study. However, the teacher/student must assess whether copying more than a reasonable portion would be fair. For example, it is probably fair to copy the whole of a book for research or study if the book is out of print so the school/TAFE can’t buy it.

4. While there may be flexible dealing exceptions, this will not often apply and the following have to be assessed…
◦the proposed use is narrow in scope
◦whether it would conflict with a normal way the copyright owner exploits the material and ◦whether the use would unreasonably harm the copyright owner

5. Changing a print work to a digitised one may be considered format shifting and the rules regarding that are at I have written to the NCU for clarification. I will share the response.

6. This is what I found about audio books on Smartcopying

Copying audio books on the iPods for loan in the school library

Trish is the librarian at Heathcoat High School. She would like to start making audio books available for loan to students on iPods. Trish has found 4 audio books from iTunes that she would like to purchase and loan to students on the library’s 20 iPods.

Can Trish copy the audio books straight from her iTunes account onto each iPod or must she purchase a copy of each audio book for each iPod?
Trish must purchase an audio book for each individual iPod. This is because s 200AB will only apply to where the copy is made for educational instruction and removed from the iPod as soon as practicable after it has been used for educational instruction. In this case, the audio books will be made available to students on a permanent basis throughout the year. Trish will need to purchase 20 copies of each audio book to download on to each iPod. The individual iPods can then be loaned out to different students in the school as required.

The 21st century library

Demonstration of the value of the school library to principals and school councils is essential as Schools look at resourcing the Australian Curriculum including phase one learning areas, the general capabilities and the Australian curriculum cross curriculum priority areas.In the 21st century school libraries need to consider their spaces, the role of the teacher librarian and the move to digital content and access in the age of BYOD (Bring your own device)


‘What do teacher librarians teach’ by Joyce Valenza and Gwyneth Jones  is an excellent infographic to highlight the  multifaceted role of teacher librarians. Evaluating resources is an important focus for teacher librarians, as is digital citizenship and educating students about  plagiarism.  Increasingly teacher librarians are working with classroom teachers, to develop student’s capacity to identify and ask good questions and to improve study and research skills.


Modern school library design will look more to buildings such as Trinity Grammar’s Tudor Centre and its contemporary approach to library design which brings together library, curriculum and technology staff.


In the age of BYOD students are not necessarily accessing the same information at the same time. For students and staff 24/7 access to resources is important, as is providing resources in a variety of formats: print, e-book, DVD, audiobooks and digital video library. Identification of suitable apps for teacher resources and for use by students is  featuring increasingly.  While we may be seeing a drop in the use of our non fiction print collections this may not be a matter of student preference.  Content and relevancy are important regardless of format.


The school library catalogue is in most schools the only place where users can search for school-owned/licensed resources all in one place. School library catalogues provide access to learning resources for the school community.  While students and teachers can use a search engine to find millions of online resources, this search will return everything online EXCEPT the very resources that your school or system has actually selected and paid for.


The student or staff member seeking books, information and learning resources expects to do one search and for that search to return all relevant material available to them, regardless of its format or its location.  Single point of search assumes an integrated set of search results, which requires integrated metadata.


We therefore need to look at 21st Century next generation library systems which will need to meet expectations that it can manage digital rights management, a seamless secure single sign-on and federated searching across a variety of multiple resources, databases and collections.  Next generations systems will need the ability to connect with  a variety of devices and increasingly to apply a personalised service similar to the Amazon or Google experience.


This is why making digital content discoverable through school library catalogues is a priority.

For a long time a priority for library staff has been to organise the physical library space in ways that are attractive, encourages users to visit, to explore and make it easy for them to find what they need, assist browsing for inspiration. We work to make location and lending of resources as seamless and self-service as possible.

We now have additional responsibilities. As well as serving our users who are visitors, browsers and borrowers of physical items in a physical library space, we now also serve our library users accessing and downloading resources in virtual spaces.


Review: The secret maker of the world – stories by Abbas El-Zein

Latest Review

The secret maker of the world – stories by Abbas El-Zein

cover imageUQP, 2014. ISBN 9780702250071.
(Age: Yr 11-Yr 12, Adult) Recommended. I resisted this collection of adult short stories at first and then I read several stories in rapid succession. I found the stories elegant but did not feel engaged. The stories while diverse featured a similar theme a man who unknowingly awaits his fate and whose self absorption has stood in his way of perceiving the truths around him. I found the stories to be packed with beautiful lines but at times wished the writer had ‘killed his darlings’ more often.
However the memory of the stories linger and play with my mind and two in particular have subsequently gripped my imagination. Red carpet is the story of a corrupt politician, as he waits in his office for his aide, mulling over his rise and rise, and preparing for the speech that will define his success. He is unaware that in the ten minute walk to deliver his speech his life will unravel. The killer blow lays in the last line.
Birds eye tells the story of the wise scholar who is oblivious to the undercurrents around him and who procrastinates and makes increasingly foolish choices as the medieval city Merv is about to be conquered and sacked. In a preface it is explained that this story is based on historical events and figures.
There is a vivid imagination and the stories leap across time, cultures and continents. I feel it will enhance any collections of short stories gathered for Years 11 and 12.

Importing Authority files into Oliver

In Management>Import, select the MARC Radio button.

From then on, see the attached screenshot for the settings

Selecting “MARC-21 Authority’ in the ‘MARC format’ field is crucial.

It is important to select ‘Load subjects’ otherwise the subject authorities won’t be loaded (which is really the point of having a subject authority).

As for the ‘Existing Records’ options. For authorities we want to replace what was there with the new SCIS authorities, so we select “Replace existing resources”.

The last time we loaded the reference only file (RSAF-marc.dat) it took 2.5 hours to process we therefore recommend that this is an overnight housekeeping task